Heritage Hog Carcass Yields by Bob Perry


Research Highlights

Husbandry of the Hogs

Seven piglets from each of the eight breeds in this study were transported to Berea College from various sources and grown out on pasture to market weight. The 1.5 acre pasture consisted primarily of fescue with some other grasses and broadleaf weeds present. Three hoop shelters with deep bedding and one shade tree provided protection from sun, wind, and rain. Free-choice feed, consisting of ground corn, soybean, and Fertrell swine premix, and water were available at all times. They were harvested and processed in three groups based on when they achieved market weight and a slot was available at the University of Kentucky meats lab.

View the Full Report online. 

American Style Cuts of Pork Used in this Study


Individual Hog Summary

Hog Breeds

  • American Guinea Hog
    The saleable yield of a Guinea Hog, cut in the American style, is 66%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 24%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 73%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Hereford Hog
    The saleable yield of a Hereford Hog, cut in the American style, is 75%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 42%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 69%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Large Black Hog
    The saleable yield of a Large Black Hog, cut in the American style, is 69%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 32%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 66%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Mulefoot Hog
    The saleable yield of a Mulefoot Hog, cut in the American style, is 67%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 36%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 66%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Gloucestershire Old Spots Hog
    The saleable yield of a Gloucestershire Old Spot Hog, cut in the American style, is 71%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 46%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 71%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Ossabaw Hog
    Average hot carcass weight 187.86 pounds with 3.49 inches of fat at the 1st rib and 2.53 inches at the 10th rib. The LEA (loin eye area) was 4.33 square inches and overall the average yield of lean muscle using the industry standard formula was 31%.
  • Red Wattle Hog
    The saleable yield of a Red Wattle Hog, cut in the American style, is 65%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 37%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 64%, not including bones, trim and backfat.
  • Tamworth Hog
    The saleable yield of a Tamworth Hog, cut in the American style, is 75%. The overall percentage of lean muscle using the industry formula based on backfat at 1st and 10th rib, loin eye area and hot carcass weight is 43%. Cut for Charcuterie, the saleable yield is 73%, not including bones, trim and backfat.


Principle Investigator:

  • Bob Perry, Chef in Residence, Dietetics and Human Nutrition, University of Kentucky

Photography:

  • Stephen Patton, Agricultural Communications, University of Kentucky

Design & Layout

  • Kevin T. Brumfield 

Acknowledgements:

  • Dr. Gregg Rentfrow, staff and students at the University of Kentucky Meats Lab
  • Jay Denham, Chef and Curemaster, The Curehouse, Louisville, Kentucky
  • Chefs Justin Dean and Steve Geddes, Relish Restaurant Group, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Dr. Sean Clark, staff and students at Berea College, Berea, Kentucky
  • The Livestock Conservancy, Pittsboro, North Carolina
  • Ronny and Beth Drennan, Broadbent Country Hams, Kuttawa, Kentucky

Funding:

This research was funded by a USDA Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant, with additional funding and support by the University of Kentucky Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.


For more information contact:

Chef Bob Perry
bob.perry@uky.edu
Phone (859) 257-1692 
Fax (859) 257-3707

Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition
University of Kentucky
210C Erikson Hall 
Lexington KY 40506


Copyright © 2014 for materials developed by University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension. This publication may be reproduced in portions or its entirety for educational or nonprofit purposes only. Permitted users shall give credit to the author(s) and include this copyright notice.
Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability or national origin.